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Social Security and Your Retirement Plan

Social Security and Your Retirement Plan

90% of Americans age 65 or older receive monthly Social Security payments. While it probably isn’t enough to live on, it will likely be a significant part of your financial plan.

The statistics are clear: Social Security comprises up to 34% of the average retiree’s income. Moreover, 71% of individuals and 48% of married couples count on Social Security benefits for at least half of their income. Your financial plan should account for your total monthly income including the Social Security benefits for yourself and your spouse.

Understand How Your Benefits Are Calculated

The Social Security administration uses a formula to figure your annual benefit. The formula adjusts your reported past income for inflation and then averages together the 35 highest income years. You can then get that amount divided into 12 monthly payments, but your age makes a big difference in how much you actually receive.

Know Your Options

Your primary insurance amount (PIA) is what you can receive if you’ve reached full retirement age (FRA, 66 for folks born between 1943 and 1954, higher thereafter). The amount will be less if you start taking payment at a younger age (starting at age 62) or greater if you wait beyond FRA (up to age 70). If you start at age 62, your PIA is reduced by 20% to 30%, but the reduction decreases each year. Your benefit increases annually by 8% for each year you wait after your FRA. Spousal benefits are at least half of the other spouse’s PIA.

Making Up The Shortfall

A common rule of thumb is that you’ll need around 70% of your pre-retirement income to have a comfortable retirement. But if you have big plans for travel and other expensive activities, you may need 100% or more of your pre-retirement income. Once you understand the limits of Social Security benefits, you have a good indication of how much you’ll need from other sources to support your desired lifestyle.

Required Minimum Distributions (RMDs)

You can start receiving penalty-free distributions from your IRA and 401(k) at age 59 ½. But thanks to a recent change, you don’t have to start taking RMDs until age 72. Moreover, you can continue to contribute to your 401(k) (and postpone RMDs) as long as you work. Most importantly, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act has suspended RMDs for 2020. However, you can still take distributions if you choose to and they will be taxed appropriately.

A Holistic Plan Is Crucial

The earlier you work out your financial plan for retirement, the better able you’ll be to take the steps necessary to meet your goals. If you’re looking for a financial advisor and advocate who will look at your unique personal situation, needs and goals to provide solutions and a personal touch, then please reach out.

I recognize I’m not a good fit for everyone, and that’s ok. That’s why I offer a complimentary introductory meeting so that we can be open and honest from the outset to ensure the best results based on our mutual compatibility.

Content in this material is for general information only and not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. This information is not intended to be a substitute for specific individualized tax advice. We suggest that you discuss your specific situation with a qualified advisor.
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